The Effect of Long-Term Drainage on Plant Community Composition, Biomass, and Productivity in Boreal Continental Peatlands

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The Effect of Long-Term Drainage on Plant Community Composition, Biomass, and Productivity in Boreal Continental Peatlands

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dc.contributor.advisor Turetsky, Merritt R.
dc.contributor.author Miller, Courtney A.
dc.date 2011-09-14
dc.date.accessioned 2011-09-16T19:30:34Z
dc.date.available 2011-09-16T19:30:34Z
dc.date.issued 2011-09-16
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10214/3028
dc.description.abstract This thesis is an investigation of the effects of long-term drainage on plant community composition, biomass and productivity in boreal continental peatlands. Because bogs are ombrotrophic, I hypothesized that bog plant community composition, biomass and productivity would be affected by drainage less than fens. I identified six Alberta peatlands (2 bogs, 4 fens) that were affected by long-term drainage through road construction or drainage ditches. I found that understory species composition in fens changed more in response to drainage than in bogs, and was related to the degree of canopy closure. Woody biomass increased in all poor fens sites with drainage, while understory biomass was not affected. I investigated the influence of drainage on primary productivity in two sites, and found that tree and moss productivity responded differently. These results have implications for peatland carbon cycling, as an increase in woody biomass will affect litter quality and future fire risk. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.subject Peatland en_US
dc.subject Boreal en_US
dc.subject Plant Community en_US
dc.subject Sphagnum en_US
dc.subject Biomass en_US
dc.subject Productivity en_US
dc.subject Climate Change en_US
dc.subject Drainage en_US
dc.subject Vegetation en_US
dc.subject Disturbance en_US
dc.title The Effect of Long-Term Drainage on Plant Community Composition, Biomass, and Productivity in Boreal Continental Peatlands en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.degree.programme Integrative Biology en_US
dc.degree.name Master of Science en_US
dc.degree.department Department of Integrative Biology en_US


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