A Quantitative Evaluation of Fish Passage Options for the Dam on the Black Sturgeon River

The Atrium, University of Guelph Institutional Repository

A Quantitative Evaluation of Fish Passage Options for the Dam on the Black Sturgeon River

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor McLaughlin, Robert
dc.contributor.author Smyth, Eric
dc.date 2011-09-12
dc.date.accessioned 2011-09-16T21:24:18Z
dc.date.available 2011-09-16T21:24:18Z
dc.date.issued 2011-09-16
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10214/3033
dc.description.abstract Humans domesticate nature to suit their needs. Such alterations can create trade-offs between human needs and ecosystem services. Quantification of these trade-offs is needed to domesticate nature more wisely. My thesis quantifies tradeoffs between invasive species control and the rehabilitation and protection of native fishes associated with the preservation and relocation of the dam on the Black Sturgeon River on the north shore of Lake Superior. I evaluated the trade-offs in terms of five performance measures: abundances of walleye, sea lamprey, lake sturgeon, and northern brook lamprey, and financial cost. I found that the management of the Black Sturgeon River would depend on value judgments because of the high complexity and uncertainty of the system. The analysis of the Black Sturgeon River could be an example of how to evaluate the trade-offs between invasive species control and native fish passage and be used for similar systems which share this trade-off. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.subject Fisheries en_US
dc.subject Risk Assessment en_US
dc.subject Walleye en_US
dc.subject Sea Lamprey en_US
dc.title A Quantitative Evaluation of Fish Passage Options for the Dam on the Black Sturgeon River en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.degree.programme Integrative Biology en_US
dc.degree.name Master of Science en_US
dc.degree.department Department of Integrative Biology en_US


Files in this item

Files Size Format View Description
Eric_Smyth_Thesis_Submission.pdf 1.203Mb PDF View/Open Thesis

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search the Atrium


Advanced Search

Browse

My Account