Assessing organic potato cropping systems at the end of the first cycle of four-year rotations using principal component analysis

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Assessing organic potato cropping systems at the end of the first cycle of four-year rotations using principal component analysis

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dc.contributor.author Lui, K.
dc.contributor.author Hammermeister, A.H.
dc.contributor.author Patriquin, D.
dc.contributor.author Martin, R.C.
dc.date.accessioned 2011-10-05T16:37:27Z
dc.date.available 2011-10-05T16:37:27Z
dc.date.issued 2008-02-05
dc.identifier.citation Lui, K., Hammermeister, A.H., Patriquin, D. and Martin, R.C. "Assessing organic potato cropping systems at the end of the first cycle of four-year rotations using principal component analysis." Canadian Journal of Soil Science 88 (2008): 543–552. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0008-4271
dc.identifier.issn 1918-1841
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10214/3056
dc.description Technical personnel and summer students at the Organic Agriculture Centre of Canada provided excellent assistance. en_US
dc.description.abstract A single or a few variables may not be sufficient to evaluate management practice effects in a complicated cropping system, so six plant and 13 soil variables were integrated using principal component analysis (PCA) to examine nine 4-yr organic potato rotations. The rotations were combinations of three forage levels (0, 1, and 2 yr of forages) with three soil amendments (monogastric compost, ruminant compost, and alfalfa meal). Quantities of amendments were estimated by soil test recommendations and amendment nutrient availabilities. In the 4th potato year, one half of each original plot was not amended (‘‘the 4th year unamended plots’’), while the other half received soil amendments (‘‘4th year amended plots’’). The first three principal components explained 67 and 63% of the overall variation for the 4th-yr amended and unamended plots, respectively. PCA ordination plots indicated that, overall, the type of soil amendments had larger effects on soil and plant variables, but forage frequencies were influential for the amendments showing weaker effects. PCA loading plots indicated that plant nutrient uptake and potato total tuber weight would be the best single variables for characterizing the current cropping systems. Plant variables, except for potato petiole nitrate, were closely displayed, but they were not strongly correlated with soil variables, which may reflect the high background fertility of this site. Applications of soil amendments in the 4th yr affected the relationships among variables, most notably the strength of relationships between soil pH and soil N variables. The results suggest that PCA provides an effective way to compare complex cropping systems, especially in situations with high site heterogeneity. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Agricultural Institute of Canada en_US
dc.subject Principal component analysis en_US
dc.subject soil amendment en_US
dc.subject livestock system en_US
dc.subject forage en_US
dc.subject potato en_US
dc.subject organic crop rotation en_US
dc.subject Analyse en composantes principales en_US
dc.subject amendement du sol en_US
dc.subject fourrage en_US
dc.subject élevage en_US
dc.subject pomme de terre en_US
dc.subject assolement biologique en_US
dc.title Assessing organic potato cropping systems at the end of the first cycle of four-year rotations using principal component analysis en_US
dc.title.alternative Evaluation de systemes de culture biologique de la pomme de terre a la fin du premier cycle d’un assolement de quatre ans par l’analyse en composantes principales. en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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